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on information from edward snowden, following allegations that president obama approved spying on german chancellor angela merkel. the white house denies that. congressman peter king and former vice president dick chaney said the u.s. should stop apologising for the nsa surveillancism. >> overall intelligence is important and need to be preserved. >> the reality is the nsa saved thousands of lives, not just in the united states, but france and germany and throughout europe. the french are ones to talk - the fact is they've carried out spying against the united states - both government and industry. >> jeanne shaheen of new hampshire takes a different stance, calling on the nsa to come clean about surveillance programs. >> i think the revelations from edward snowden and the secrets that have been revealed are doing significant damage to our bilateral relationships with germany, with mexico, with the other countries where the suggestion is that we've listened in. we have repair twork do. we have hard questions we need to ask of the nsa about what is happening in the program. >> meanwhile -
's aw at this hour, star with the latest leak from former nsa contractor edward snowden. says theington post" national security agency has been hacking be data links that connect google and yahoo! around the world. laways the agency skirt the by collecting data from millions of local web users via underwater fiber-optic cables. kate moody explains. >> world leaders, foreign citizens, and internet giants, the latest victims of the national security agency's surveillance programs according to intelligence linked by edward snowden. the nsa has admitted to the program to access internet user accounts but described new reports that infiltrated yahoo! and google databases as factually incorrect. breakings not an essay into any databases. it would be illegal for us to do that. -- does collect information on terrorists and our national intelligence priorities, but we are not authorized to go into a u.s. company's servers and take data. we have to go to a court process for doing that. >> but the "washington post" says there is more to the story, reporting details of a separate over program-- nsa
. >> these are the slides leaked by whistleblower edward snowden in june. as long as the national security agency or the federal bureau of investigation are 51% sure that the user is foreign, their emails, audio and video chats, photographs and documents are all theirs for the searching. this >> carefully worded denials followed from the companies, arguing that they give specific information to the u.s. government as legally required on a case-by-case basis. these assurances have been left irrelevant with the news and release of a new slide showing that the n.s.a. bypassed this system, gaining entry to yahoo and google's data centres by breaking into their fibre optic cables. u.s. citizens no longer receive protections as all the information is considered foreign. >> the real concern is the government uses the tapping of overseas cablings as a back door. >> one thing is clear - any data protections that exist are only for u.s. citizens. >> if you are a non-american outside the united states, basically they have a free pass to do what they like. >> the white house derives that authority from execu
bombing reminded us that terrorism is still an ex existentialnd threats. a month later, edward snowden revelationsing about massive surveillance that our government was doing. this kicked off a healthy public debate about how we balance privacy and security. as you heard from greg, it is our mission at rand to improve the quality of public policy decision-making. that is why we brought together this panel. people who have different views. everyone here has deep expertise. we are hoping to have an open discussion. there will be some things and questions they will be unable to answer because of the situations. we will try to guide the discussion over a few topics. we will start with trying to understand what works with intelligence security and why we feel we need to put measures in place. we are then going to turn to what are the increased risks of mass collection of data on the public? are the what implications of this on how we implement foreign policy. ofserves as an overarching the things i would like to see us cover. i would like to start with the first question on the rent we face
edward snowden. >>> well changes on the security clearance system for the federal workers could be in the wakes of the shootings. and they had a hearing on the advocacy of the clearances. the question is how did they get that security clearance despite a series of violent outbursts and repeated brushes with the law? >>> syria has destroyed their weapons. they started in september when they broke the agreement for syria. and this after the obama administration threatened military action against the syrian government. >> we are now in a position to conduct any further productional mixing of chemical weapons, as far as they are disclosed. and that is suppose to have happen for them by next summer. >>> be careful if you are out in georgetown tonight. they will be out and about later. there's no crooks on out there who needed to rip off three people just this past tuesday. one in wisconsin avenue, one on o street and one at m and thomas jefferson street. that robert was last seen wearing the blue jeans, riding the pegs on the back. >>> and they will not miss the scaffolding, but they
that killed a u.s. ambassador. >> accused nsa leaker edward snowden making new friends and maybe looking for a new home. germany maybe? >> and unearthed a drug tunnel between mexico and the united states that is so sophisticated, it is being called a supertunnel. we're going to take you on a tour. welcome to around the world". i'm suzanne malveaux. >> i'm michael holmes. thanks for your company today. welcome to our international viewers with us all week. >> first we're going to get to this, benghazi, libya, it was just last ept, four americans were killed in a terrorist attack. one of them the u.s. ambassador. >> today a lot of pressure from republicans in congress to hear directly from cia operatives who were in libya during the attack and also afterwards. so far they have not talked to congress. >> we here at cnn have reported the cia has specifically told those operators to keep quiet. drew griffin is with the cnn investigations unit. drew, first of all, excellent reporting on all of this. they're pushing back right now on what you're reporting. what are they saying? >> being complet
. >>> coming up on "new day," a few proceed from edward snowden. he says he's no criminal. wait until you hear our response from the leaders in the nation's capitol. he says he is sorry for past mistakes for smoking co-cable. he will not resign and he wants the public to see the alleged evidence. t thing i need. seriously? let's take this puppy over to midas and get you some of the good 'ol midas touch. hey you know what? i'll drive! i really didn't think this through. brakes, tires, oil, everything. (whistling) hall we do is go out to dinner.? that's it? i mean, he picks up the tab every time, which is great...what? he's using you. he probably has a citi thankyou card and gets 2x the points at restaurants. so he's just racking up points with me. some people... ugh! no, i've got it. the citi thankyou preferred card. now earn 2x the points on dining out and entertainment, with no annual fee.to apply, go to citi.com/thankyoucards american express credit card, every purchase earns you 2% cash back, which is deposited in your fidelity account. is that it? actually... there's no annual fee and no l
and nsa spying story. all of it coming by leaks by the former u.s. defense contractor edward snowden. tonight's revelations involve very big names in the internet and e-mail world. now big companies are calling for new privacy laws to stop u.s. intelligence agencies from breaking into their data overseas. for more on all of it we turn to our chief foreign affairs correspondent andrea mitchell in our d.c. newsroom tonight. andrea, good evening. >> reporter: good evening, brian. the tech companies worry they are losing an arm's race with the nsa which nbc news confirms has been hacking into google and yahoo data centers around the world as fast as the company has put up firewalls. vacuuming up e-mail and phone records. google and yahoo data centers in all corners of the globe reach targets by data collection by nsa and british intelligence. as first reported in the "washington post" they found more documents leaked by edward snowden, hundreds of thousands of e-mails, search queries and other activity collected, decoded and filtered and possible intelligence targets transmitted to the n
what we see is that the potential risk to the united states of leakers like edward snowden changes the calculus of who we conduct intelligence against. i don't think there should be any principled reason not to spy on allies, but you have to take into account the risk it's going to be disclosed and that can be harmful. it underlines the extent of edward snowden's treason that all of this is out in public. our intelligence gathering has been damaged in ways we can hardly talk about. >> you talk about both sides, conservatives and republicans, are commenting about this. let's read two examples of that. one is from investors, business daily, they have an editorial. we seem to be going out of way to alienate friends and allies in recent months. they all have found to varying degrees an unreliable partner in the united states under president obama. they're conservative. let's look at what's in the "new york times" this morning. i've seen an america that was respected, hated, feared, and loved, but i was confronted repeatedly with an attitude toward america that i've never heard before.
. >> the work of the n.s.a. is under fire, because of revelations by former n.s.a. analyst edward snowden. documents he leaked revealed the n.s.a. has been collecting phone calls and text messages of millions of american citizens. the author of the patriot act has proposed a new law called the freedom act aimed at ending the sweeping phone tapping program. the act would stop drag net collection of phone calls of american citizens, place stronger restrictions on who is targeted and appoint a special advocate to the super secret fisa courts to protect privacy rights. national security director told the committee the content of phone calls remain secret, in a virtual lock box unless there is a link to possible terrorism and that he says is rare. >> they would only be looked at when we had reasonable and articulatable suspicion that we had connection to a foreign or al-qaeda terrorists group and look into that box. in 2012, we had 288 such selectors that we could go and look into that. that's it. of the billions of records, only 288. >> at the hearing, there was relatively little discussion a
recently of a man looking like edward snowden doing his grocery shopping and now it seems he's got himself a normal job. but it's likely given the fact that he's an i.t. specialist he's not going to be sitting in some big room with a load of other techies, he's probably going to do it remotely. there are security concerns around him, so he's probably not going to be very clear or very public about where he's working from. >> it sounds like he's going to stay in russia, forever i mean. it's starting to sound more like that at least. >> well, his father, lawrence snowden, came to visit him a few weeks back and said he was doing very well in russia, he was grateful to the russian authorities for having granted him asylum that he felt he could lead a normal life here and that he was able to find a job here, and there have been a lot of companies who have been public about the fact that they've been looking to recruit edward snowden. he's obviously a name that you would want to have up there on your text specitech specialist and the russian version of facebook tried to recruit him earlier on. t
something that comes to mind that what we now know about spying comes from the leaks of edward snowden. >> yeah, glenn greenwald lives in rio and has all of snowden's documents. snowden is on a one-year temporary asylum and not giving any interviews. and greenwald has become the spokesperson for this. so we went down to rio. we were fortunate enough to spend a couple of days with him. and just kind of see what his life is like right now. but it's really fascinating, because when history looks back on this, greenwald will be a big part of this. >> also in your show your are going to talk about the impact on washington and what you found here in this environment was a bit of a surprise. >> it is a surprise. it cuts across the partisan lines so broodly. we interviewed allen west the former tea party representative and allen grayson who is a representative from florida in the house right now, and their views were very, very similar on this. that it's unconstitutional it lax oversight from congress, not enough is being done about it. the only people who seem to support it are people who hav
currently in the u.s. senate. >>> a growing fury after more allegations growing out of edward snowden's leaked documents. this time about the nsa tapping world alabalealleys. fault lines correspondent explores what it is like to live under constant surveillance. ♪ >> in many ways the nsa surveillance story can seem abstract. sure the sgovment collecting information, but what does that really mean for someone's life? to fine out we went to meet a group of people who definitely know they are being spied on. >> after 9/11 it wasn't just the nsa that increased surveillance. here at the city level in new york, the nypd brought in to senior officials from the cia to help spy on its own citizens. the program is targeting one community, muslims. secret documents show that the nypd is conducting surveillance of entire muslim neighborhoods. >> they visited book stores, cafes, hookah joints, of course mosques. >> reporter: and record conversations using hidden microphones, collect the names and phone gragaits. >> how were they reacting to foreign events abroad, the egyptian revolution or the c
almost all based on information leaked by former n.s.a. contractor edward snowden suggest the u.s. has been spying on many countries and their leaders, including important u.s. allies. >> the white house denies the report that president obama knew the n.s.a. was eavesdropping on german leader angela merkel. we have the latest. >> a nine member delegation will meet with senior government officials over allegations of widespread spying against leaders. new allegations surfaced that president obama approved spying on german chancellor angela merkel. according to the wall street journal, the president was unaware the n.s.a. was spying on world leaders and ordered the agency to stop some of the monitoring programs after learning of them. >> the president assured the chancellor that the united states is not monitoring and will not monitor the communications of the chancellor. >> it's not just the europeans who are upset. over the weekend, thousands marched on washington to express their outrage. >> against mass surveillance and i'm truly honored to speak for all whistle blowers. >> some memb
. >> for the last several month, documents that the whistleblower edward snowden leaked showed a dragnet beyond france and spain. it's failed to become a major issue in washington. the bugging of angela merkel's phone received attention because the strategic implications of being caught. the focus worries a visiting delegation of european parliament airians investigating the scale of the u.s. program. >> spying on friends, not just on leaders, on citizens. >> tuesday's hearing was primarily about the u.s.'s domestic surveillance operations with james clapper and keith alexander key to restrict changes to variability of collecting data of u.s. citizens. >> more to come on al jazeera. coming home to start again. we are in the philippines town of zamboanga, where the standoff destroyed the homes of 10,000 families. and women out of work in iran. we look at the underrepresentation in the country's labour force. stay with us. >>> welcome back. a recap of the top stories - another senior leader of the muslim brotherhood has been arrested in egypt. the pictures are said to show esam el-arian when tak
. and then the edward snowden nsa leaks, raising questions about how much the president may or may not have known. in september, more of a slide because of the president's indecision on whether to attack syria. and now, between the government shutdown and the bungled health care rollout, he hit an all time low of 42%. getting close to president bush's number. obama buy og refer sees a trend. >> he works at a different timetable than everybody else. sometimes he's ahead of the curve. sometimes he's behind the curve. the question is will he get back up. >> reporter: in the past, even when the president experienced a dip in his job rating his personal likability never took a hit. this time, more folks view him negatively, 45% than positively, 41%. >> david axelrod believes that is due to this appearance of detachment on issues like health care and nsa. >> he needs to step up his visibility on these questions. i have no doubt he's doing it internally because i know how he operates, but the public needs to see that. and that's what's driving some of those personal ratings down. >> and he keeps saying
. a report in the "the washington post" sited reports leaked by edward snowden. the latest allegations come as a delegation from the european parliament is visiting washington to investigate claims on european leaders and citizens eavesdropping. >> the damage to the united states is so high that something has to be done on that. i hope that it will be successful because we need messages for our people that it can't happen on citizens or leaders. >> in rome they want to know if the nsa has listening to phone calls at the vatican. a report says the nsa spied on the vatican and his predecessor, and listened in on cardinals. the vatican says, "we are unaware of anything on the issue. in any case we have no concerns about it." >> french president francis hollande takes on the footy clubs on thursday, proposing a 75% top rate of tax. club bosses say it will make it impossible to compete at a european level and are threatening to cancel night matches scheduled for the final week of november. >> the boston red sox are champions after crushing st louis cardinals 6-1, kath turner reports. >> the bost
%. and that slid after the benghazi hearings, after the irs scandal, after edward snowden started leaking information about the nsa, and by september, it was down to 45% amid his indecision on syria, now at 42. but what's also knew, people don't like the president as much as they used to. his personal likability rating had been holding up. but now, his positive rating is upside down at 41%, considering his negative rating at 45%. people in this country don't think the health care law, obama care, is a good idea. in our poll, 47% to 37% think it's a bad idea. finally, the republican party, they're not too popular either. 22% of americans feel positively about the party, richard. >> well, we know, tracie, who does have a high approval rating in washington, d.c., tracie pots! 100% here. that's right, bill and myself, we think you're number one. thank you. >> reporter: sure. >>> removal of chemical weapons in syria. they have destroyed all necessary ingredients. this come as day before the imposed deadline by national regulators. it means country no longer has the ability to make new weapons.
nsa contractor edward snowden. the reports say by tapping into the links, the nsa has positioned itself to collect at will data from hundreds of millions of users' accounts, this would include emails sent and received, as well as content such as texts, audio and video. the "post" says during the 30-day period up to january 9th of this year, the nsa used the links to collect more than 180 million new records. google said it is outraged at the lengths to which the government seems to have gone to intercept data from the firm's private fiber network. the nsa chief general keith alexander has denied the allegations. he said the report is incorrect and that his organization obtains court orders before collecting necessary information. google and yahoo! user accounts through a court-approved process. the post's report suggesting other means could intensify criticism of the u.s. government. >>> once again officials in taiwan say a magnitude 6.3 earthquake hit the island's east coast. we don't know whether there has been damage the or casualties. taiwan's central weather bureau says the
.s. intelligence analyst edward snowden apparently has a new job in russia. his lawyer says he is working technical support for one of russia's biggest private websites. but he did not say which one. he has been in russia since june when he was granted asylum. police say they have obtained video that allegedly shows the mayor of vancouver smoking a crack pipe. it is get to be seen if they will press charges. where do you go if you need to buy a pair of boots or a guitar, or even some wine? if you are anything like me, the chances are you click on amazon. the site started as an easy way to sell books in 1994. it has become a global retail giant. thanks to the drive and vision of its founder, jeff bezos. amazon has become the everything store. he joined me earlier in san francisco. >> before we get more ammo not -- amazon news today, i want to remind you of how revolutionary it was of an online bookstore in the dark ages of 1994. >> sure, in 1994, no one really knew what the internet would become. but jeff bezos, he was working on wall street at the time and sees the growth rate and decides he wants
that the infiltration was on wednesday by edward snowden. and by tapping into the links, the nsa has positioned itself to collect data from hundreds of millions of user accounts, this would include e-mails sent and received as well as text, audio and video. the post says that during a 30-day period up to january 9th of this year, the nsa used the links to collect more than 180 million new records. google said it is outraged at the lengths to which the government seems to have gone to intercept data from the firm's private fiber network. nsa chief general keith alexander has denied the allegations. he says that this is incorrect and that his organization gets court orders before collecting necessary information. the post's report suggests other means could intensify criticism of the u.s. government. >>> peek in charge of the fukushimas plant may find themselves working under different conditions. officials at the industry ministry have taken steps to turn tokyo electric power company into a holding company. they want the officials to review how the company is organized and they hope to split it up and
the allegations, coming from information leaked by former n.s.a. contractor edward snowden. australia prime minister said that his government had not broken any laws. >> four palestine fighters in gaza have been killed by israeli troops. violence broke out after several israelis tanks crossed the boarder into the gaza strip. it's the latest of a series of incursions into the area. >> thailand is one step closer to passing amnesty laws that could allow the return of former prime minister thaksin shinawatra. thousands have been protesting against the draft bill and more rallies are banned. thaksin shinawatra has been in exile following corruption allegations. >> in the early morning hours of friday the thai house passed pa blankets amnesty bill,ing it the opposition party have been against. there has been protests since this was introduced back in august. the last couple of days the opposition party in front of their headquarters in bangkok called in protesters. the numbers expected to be about 10,000, and that could grow throughout the day. the passage of the bill was a surprise in the early
contractor edward snowden and said the government had not broken any laws. thailand is one step closer to passing a controversial amnesty law that could allow return of the prime minister. thousands of people are protesting against the draft bill and morae rallies are planned and we have more in bankok. >> in the early morning hours of friday the thai house passed the controversial blanket amnesty bill, something the opposition party has been strongly against and protests in the months since this was first introduced back in august and the last couple of days the opposition party in the headquarters here has been calling protesters in from the country and the numbers at 10,000 and could grow through the day on friday and the passage of the bill was a surprise on friday and supposed to take place saturday morning. there is concern with this bill that some people who have been convicted of crimes over the past decade plus will be allowed -- let out of jail and a former prime minister in exile. there is big concern of what might happen to thousands of protesters on the streets of bangkok
national security agency contractor edward snowden is prepared to reveal what he knows. german media say opposition lawmaker traveled to moscow to meet with snowden. he says snowden told him that he's ready to speak to german prosecutors and members of parliament. they are looking into allegations american agents tapped the cell phone of chancellor angela merkel. strobel says snowden made it clear he knows a lot. snowden has revealed details of several top u.s. surveillance programs. u.s. leaders are demanding the russian officials return him to the u.s. so he can face charges of espionage and theft of government property. >>> germany has criticized the apparent spying operation against merkel. now u.s. secretary of state john kerry admitted some of the spying activities were inappropriate, but stopping short of clarifying the details. kerry spoke to a conference in london via video link on thursday. >> some of these actions have reached too far, and we are going to make sure that does not happen in the future. >> but he defended u.s. intelligence gathering, saying it has stopped numerou
, along with google and red hat and dozens of others. >>> edward snowden, offering to help germany in the suspected phone tapping of merkel. giving him a letter to give to the chancellor. he called the actions of the u.s. government harmful and offered to visit germany to help in its investigation. >> >> and meantime, john kerry has acknowledged that the u.s. overstepped it's boundaries. he defended the nsa's work, and he said that it was party that the agency had gone beyond what was necessary to keep the country safe >> in some cases, i acknowledge as does the president that some of these actions have gone too far, and we'll make sure that that does not happen in the future. >> the president is going to cairo on sunday, the day before morsmore so -- >> the rising tension of the region, israeli war planes are striking on syria. >> israel is not confirming flor denying the reports, they don't usually comment on these. we have had reports of alleged israeli airstrikes in syria. one in january, and that was believed to be on a convoy carolinaing hezbollah. and in october, reports of
that that does not happen in the future. >> meanwhile edward snowden is meeting a german member of parliament in moscow yesterday and offered to help with germany's investigation. >>> now to syria where there are reports of an israeli air strike. stephanie decker has more from jerusalem. >> reporter: israel is not confirming for denying these reports. this is not unusual, never really comments opthese matters. we have had reported throughout the year of al'emed syrian strikes one happened in january, and later in the year, believed to be a missile depo again at the time the israelis didn't comment, and just recently in october reports of a strike on the syrian/lebanese border, again no reaction from the israelis. what we do know is that israel takes the threat of hezbollah very seriously. and if any weapons get transferred to any hostile group especially hezbollah, it would take action, but the official line here from israel is no comment. >>> and the man charged with trying to end the bloody war in syria is back in the country. imran khan has more. >> reporter: this is the man desperately tr
will not fall into the wrong hands. >> there'll be no clementsy for edward snowden. he's asking for leniency from the government. members of the white house denied his request. he leaked secret government documents about the n.s.a., including information that the u.s. has spied on allies. if he returns to the u.s. he faces charges of espionage. he is in russia where he was granted asylum. >> a gunman involved in the killing at los angeles international airport talked to police. he told them he acted alone, the admission coming after he was shot by officers. he killed a t.s.a. employee and injured three others. the 23-year-old is facing murder charges and the death penalty. he's in critical condition and under 24 hour armed surveillance. >> an alabama airport is being reopened after a bomb threat. officials at birmingham-shuttlesworth international airport say they found a note warning of a pom in the main terminal -- of a bomb in the main terminal and called the federal bureau of investigation. after a sweep the airport was cleared. it was up and running two hours later. a dozen flight were
to changing the retirement age. many of those recipients say they want more benefits. >> edward snowden could face a tough punishment if he ever returns to the u.s. many rejected his request for leniency. snowden was charged with espionage after leaking classified documents about the nsa surveillance program. he's currently in russia where he was granted asylum. >>> tha film about the life of nelson mandela will soon be near you. we have the nelson family reaction. >> i'm prepared to die. >> the long walk to freedom had a tough task. from nelson mandela's days as a young man committed to the struggle of racial equality. the film spares no details of his 27 years behind bars. a time that history and the film proved only made the man and his cause stronger. >> your struggle, your commitment, and your discipline has has brought me to stand before you today. >> we should remember where we come from, and that this freedom was hard, and that it was won at a very, very heavy price. >> the $35 million film documents the inner works of the family. the film marked the day in south africans went to the
classified documents provided by former nsa contractor edward snowden. spanish government officials summoned the u.s. ambassador for an explanation. spanish law prohibits the collecting of such information without permission. >>> german media are reporting that agents also bugged chancellor angela merkel's phone. u.s. officials have not denied the allegation but say no such surveillance is taking place now. they say they're conducting a review of their intelligence gathering methods. >> i noted the other day a readout from a phone call the president had with chancellor merkel made clear that we do not and will not monitor the chancellor's communications. >> carney said last summer president barack obama ordered a comprehensive review of how the u.s. gathers intelligence. he said the investigation should be completed by the end of the year. defense secretary chuck hagel says the allegations do not reflect a lack of respect. >> we have great respect for our partners, our allies, who cooperate with us and we cooperate with them to try to keep the world safe, to keep each other safe, to keep our
contractor edward snowden. the spying allegations have forced officials in the white house to promise changes to how they gather information. >>> u.s. forces are trying to break up a group of militants in east africa linked to al qaeda. they've killed two members of al shabaab in a drone strike. the militant group is based in southern somalia. interior ministry officials there said two of its members
politician says edward snowden is willing to testify in an investigation that u.s. agents monitored the cell phone of german chancellor angela merkel. the lawmaker met the former u.s. intelligence contractor in moscow. german media say the legislator of the opposition green party hans christian strobella spent three hours with snowden. snowden reportedly said he's ready to speak before german prosecutors and members of parliament. he told german tv that snowden appeared to have a lot of information about the eavesdropping issue. observers believe his testimony will help shed light on the alleged spying but they also expect washington to oppose the move. the u.s. government demands that moscow return snoweden to face charges. he now lives in russia under asylum. >>> representatives of an international monitoring organization are reporting progress in the first phase of their efforts to rid syria of chemical weapons. officials with the organization for the prohibition of chemical weapons say the government has destroyed all of its production facilities. >> the syrian government has completed w
on the surveillance program. >> i think the revelations from edward snowden, and secrets that are revealed are doing damage to our bilateral relationships with germany, mexico and other countries where the suggestion is that we've lisped in -- listened in. i think we have repair work to do and hard questions it ask of the nsa about what is happening in the program. >> it's a different view from the chairman of the house homeland security committee. congressman peter king says america should stop apologising for the nas. >> the reality is the nsa saved thousands of lives - not just the united states, but france, germany and throughout europe. the french carried out spying operations ai gaips the united states -- against the united states. as far as germany - that's where the hamburg plot began laing to nchb -- leading to 9/11. >> former secretary of state madeleine albright agrees, saying the u.s. is not the only one that spies on world leaders, but says france listened to her calls. a french ambassador once ask her about something she said on a private call. madeleine albright said: >> a roadside bo
these stories when they come out, what does this new revelation from edward snowden from nsa reveal what the agency has been up to. >> the way that you just introduced that is crucial, right? because virtually every one of these stories, the day that it comes out, everybody pulls out their hair, runs around, i can't believe this is happening. this is crazy and then quietly over the next couple days we get revisions to the story. sometimes we get wholesale rewrites of the story and they don't appear to be anything like what they whrp they were first broken. we did that with the story we discussed here on the panel one night when it came out "the washington post" broke the story originally and then it had to be basically rewritten a couple days later. we have seen the same thing with the stories about the united states vacuuming up virtually every phone call across europe turns out that wasn't true. partners in europe were involved in that turns out they probably about most of the vacuuming for us. i'm reluctant to offer any kind of definitive take on what this means until we know that it
leaked by whistle blower edward snowden in june revealing u.s. authorities are demanding internet companies hand them user information. as long as the national security agency or the fbi are 51% sure that the user is foreign, their emails, audio and video chats, photographs and documents are theirs for the searching. carefully worded denils follow from the companies, arguing that they only give specific information to the u.s. government as legally required on a case by case basis. these assurances have been left irrelevant sholling the number of sa -- showing the nsa has bypassed this, breaking into googles and yahoo!'s cables. citizens no longer receive protection awes all information is -- as all information is considered foreign. >> the government backs into the cables as a backdoor to get around the complaints. >> one thing is clear - any data protections that do exist are only for u.s. citizens. >> if you are not a citizen, if you are a non-american outside the united states, basically they have a free pass do what they like. >> the white house derives the authority from ex
edward snowden. also the best and worst places in the world to grow old. we'll take a look at where seniors are struggling - ahead. ed d . >>> welcome back to al jazeera america. i'm jonathan betz with the headlines tonight. charges have been filed against a suspect in the lax shooting that killed a t.s.a. officer. if convicted 23-year-old paul ciancia could face the death penalty. authorities say he left a note at the scene. >> he made a conscious decision to kill multiple t.s.a. in the employe employees, addressing them staying that he want to instill fear in their minds. >> healthcare.gov is down for maintenance - the website used to enrol in the insurance program and will be offline until 9am sunday morning. pakistan's wanted man was buried. taliban chief hakimullah mehsud was killed by a u.s. drone yesterday. supporters have threatened suicide bombings in revenge. hakimullah mehsud's death has pakistani politicians concerned about the future of peace talks with the taliban. we have more from peshawar. >> this is seen as a blow to the taliban pakistan, which may have a struggle
and four others wounded in the attack. >> edward snowden's plea for clementsy has been denied by the white house and congress. he made the plea in a letter. white house where are said edward snowden should return to the u.s. and face charges for allegedly leaking classified information. >> secretary of state john kerry's visit to the middle east - his stop in cairo was his first visit to egypt since mohamed morsi was deposed. john kerry insisted the withholding of aid to the military is not punishment. we discussed it earlier with military experts. >> he's trying to appeal to the public opinion. >> in egypt? >> in egypt, not the u.s. in egypt, after what happened last june or july, asking president mohamed morsi and the american reaction towards what happened, which a lot of egyptians thought was hostile and inappropriate. they thought the american government was siding with the muslim brotherhood. it created uneasy innocence. john kerry is trying hard to restore the image of the u.s., trying to build bridges with the egyptian government. >> should he be building a bridge with the governme
can abuse the power that has been given to them. that includes rogue actors. edward snowden did not do what the government expected. in los angeles there was the public disorder and intelligence division that compiled information and used it for political purposes. information that is collected for law enforcement and security purposes is often used on political groups. >> if i could provide some perspective. the fbi operates through mandates that are codified in statute laws written by our congress and signed by the president into law. that process has produced, appropriately and necessarily, oversight, not just in the executive branch of government itself. the department of justice is obviously in the fbi as well. but also with the congress and through the court system and the judicial branch. that is to make sure that they and and day out, the work we are doing -- day in and day out, the work we are doing is representing the people of the united states and is what is required at that point in time. they have an expectation that we use those tools. they have an equal expectation that
. about a month later, edward snowden began releasing real elevations about massive surveillance. in this kicked off a healthy public debate about how we balance privacy and security. and as you've heard from greg, it's our mission to try to improve the quality of public policy decision making which is an important discussion to be had. that's why we brought together the panel. people have different views. while everyone here has deep expertise in experience with part of it. we're hoping to have ab open discussion about it. in will be some thing they'll be unable to question. unable to an and just because of the situation. but we're going try to guide the discussion over a few topics today. we're going to start can with try to understand what works in intelligence and security. why do we feel we need to put it in place. we're going turn to what are the increased risk of mass collection of information on the public. and finally, turn to what is the -- what do the implications of this an how we implement foreign policy. with that sort of an overarching on the topic i like to see us
n.s.a. leaker edward snowden is that the u.s. government apparently monitored the phone calls of at least 30 world leaders, including most infamously, german chancellor angela merkel, who was holding up a new encrypted cell phone to say you can't touch me now. a little m.c. hammer there. brit, we've heard about mass data collection. but when you're talking about targeted, the phones of our allies, our friends, people that president obama sits in the oval office with and at summits with, is that over the line? >> do we know if the phones were being actually listened in on and calls recorded and the substance of the calls noted? or is this another case where we have her phone calls, we know whom she called and when and for how long they spoke? my own guess is that it is that which i'veñr just described. and moreover, this has been going on for a long time in one way or another. we spy on foreign leaders, theyñr spy on our leaders or try to. we're better at it perhaps than they are and they don't like it. now it is out in the open. the people affected have to be indignant, and
about the fallout from the edward snowden leaks. >> this is the most serious leak, most serious compromise in the u.s. intelligence committee. >> because of the amount of it and the type. >> the amount and the type. >> website reboot. secretary of hhs kathleen sebelius faces questions on capitol hill wednesday after healthcare.gov went down over the weekend adding fuel to the criticism and more fodder for snl. >> i have a number of friendly tips to help you deal with those problems. for example, have you tried restarting your computer. sometimes it helps to turn the computer off and turn it back on. we don't know why. it just does. >> poetic license, the literally legend maya angelou joins us this hour. children's love for books. >> good day, i'm andrea mitchell in washington. edward snowden's leaks keep coming faster than the white house can even respond. over the weekend the nsa claimed president obama had no idea angela merkel's personal cell phone was tapped back since 2002. so how credible is that denial? joining me now is chuck todd nbc's white house correspondent, politic
made by former nsa contractor edward snowden. he describes himself as a whistleblower, but others say he's a traitor. >> christiane amanpour has spoken with the journalist who worked closely with edward snowden to expose these secrets and joins you now from london. you had that interview with glenn greenwald. what struck you most about him, he is one determined man on a bit of a mission really. >> he continues to insist that despite the vociferous criticism that officials have leveled at the snowden leaks and at him and the press for publishing them, it is not all about terrorism. he keeps saying loorks, they want us to believe that everything that's being leaked is just about life and death terrorism. but it's not. there are a lot of other revelations, a lot of revelations about economic and commercial and industrial espionage. there are a lot of revelations obviously which started the firestorm of protests around the world. about spying and collecting metadata from ordinary citizens. that is what really drives glen green wald really, really crazy and let me play you just a little bi
possible by the great edward snowden. would you call him an american dissident in the same way -- >> i would -- >> you describe -- you would? >> i would, indeed. one of the things i think is a fact of our lives, i think we all know it, 1984 is not a theoretical possibility but a regard reality. we're all under surveillance at all times. the wonderful thing about edward snowden and glen greenwald and chelsey manning, it's not that they're preventing it but they're watching them watching us. that's worth something and allows us to push back and demand something better. >> bill ayers, thank you, sir, for joining us this afternoon. >> appreciate it. >>> coming up, the republicans' self-destruction tour invades the old dominion. yes, virginia. and this, this is no laughing matter. >> i think liberals don't have much of a sense of humor compared to conservatives. that's my personal experience. >>> four . >>> for republicans, 2016 may begin in virginia or maybe it ends there. because in the final week of what's been a disastrous gubernatorial campaign, potential presidential candidates includ
information from whistle blower edward snowden may emerge detailing cooperation and the dragnet surveillance of citizens, if not the monitoring of leaders' phone calls. >> that delegation will be in washington until wednesday. we are also expecting delegations from the french and german intelligence agencies at some point in the coming days and weeks. the question is whether they are truly concerned about the surveillance of their citizens or the surveillance of their leaders, political and business. >> we have reports that there'll be more talks on spying held in europe. >> tens of millions of twitter users around the world are expressing their thoughts in 140 characters or less. many want to the crackdown on the growing hate speech on the social media platform. we have this story. >> twitter is becoming a favourite spot for tech-savvy hate monningers. that's according to a report by a center in international human rights. the center gave twitter an f grade when it came to policing the hate messages on its fight. >> facebook was the best to deal with issues. twitter was the worst. we. the
on and talk about edward snowden. does he consider himself a hero as supporters do. how does he react to the anger of those who call him a traitor? >> i think he is disappointed. he doesn't consider himself a hero. i think he eschews any such label. i think he considers himself a patriot and an american and a whistleblower. and i think that's right. obviously all sorts of incendiary and inflammatory words have been thrown around, some of which don't even fit the legal definition, if people were to bother to look it up. but, no, he didn't see himself as a hero. >> one of the people attending the rally, a man named dave miller, told u.s.a. today, the national progress is more control, more power. no matter what they say, we're going down the path towardteri ttierney? do you agree? >> i think we are in the position of turnkey tierney. we are right there. we are following the playbook. >> how has it hurt anybody? >> how has it hurt anybody? the fact that all of our personal information is being stored in a big data storage facility in utah, anybody at any time who works for the nsa or any
governments should be aware that more information from whistle blower edward snowden may emerge detailing their cooperation in the dragnet surveillance of their citizens if not the monitoring of their leaders' phone callings. that's european parliamentary delegation will be in washington until wednesday. we are also expecting delegations from the french and german intelligence agencies at some point in the coming days and weeks. the question is whether they are truly concerned about the mass surveillance of their citizens or the surveillance of their leaders, both political and business. >> that was al jazerra reporting. also on monday the head of the senate intelligence committee, diane feinstein once a loyal supporter of the nsa broke ranks she can norankssaying she is opf collecting intelligence on u.s. allies. words of praise from president obama during a ceremony formally installing his new fbi director. he took over for a stepping down director. president obama describes him as someone who knows what is right and what is wrong. he served as a deputy attorney general during the georg
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